Training for your Sitecore project

To mis-quote Benjamin Franklin ‘By failing to train you are training to fail”.  You can provide the best tools in the world but unless people know how to use them, they are useless.  And the more complex the tool the more apparent that becomes.  I think Sitecore is a simple, intuitive tool but then I have been delivering training on Sitecore for eight years.  I’m now familiar with the system. But I do know that at first sight it can appear overwhelming.

So, how best to use training to mitigate risk in your Sitecore project, or any other for that matter? 

I recommend a three-phase approach starting as early as possible in the project.  If it is possible start before the vendor is decided.  Phase one is pretraining.  Phase two shortly before Go Live or UAT. And finally phase three is ongoing maintenance to allow for staff churn, new features etc.

Let’s look at each phase in a bit more detail. 

Phase One/Pretraining

Phase one is the first tranche of training.  As stated above it should be undertaken early in the project.  Assuming you are starting the project by selecting the vendor for a software project; once you have a short list consider sending key stakeholders to classroom training on each of your shortlisted vendors.  While it may be considered an unnecessary cost it will provide a good insight into the real-world use of the various offerings.  And also consider that the cost of pretraining is insignificant compared to the cost of a failed project.

Once you have decided on a vendor, if they have not already, key business and technical staff should attend appropriate training for their role.  Selection should be based upon who will be working with the implementation partner.  Training at this early stage will equip the team with the skills to work with the implementer.  It also shows attendees the capabilities of the chosen platform; they know what to ask for. 

If an implementation partner hasn’t been selected yet training this early can also be useful in their selection.

Delivery for this tranche should be public classroom training, unless you have the numbers to make a private course worthwhile (hint 6+ staff is the tipping point from a public class to a private one).  Classroom training allows for questions to be asked and a good trainer can adapt the delivery to ensure the learning outcomes are achieved.

Phase two/Go Live

Phase two is where the bulk of your users receive training – this is because you are about to go live with your new website.  By now it should be possible to train on, or at least reference, your application as it will be implemented.  Various options are available.  eLearning, although to be fair I am not a fan of eLearning, it is too easy to click through and be distracted by other incoming tasks and emails without absorbing the information.  However, it is cheap and repeatable.  For business users, you could even consider bespoke eLearning.  While the initial cost is high you own the content and there are negligible ongoing costs plus it covers maintenance training or phase three.  Classroom training such as public courses will be generic and provide a good understanding of the features of the chosen application – it will probably be useful to have an internal follow up to familiarise business users with their application.  Developers should be fine with just a public course and some time to get to know the code.  It is, again, possible to get customized or completely bespoke training delivered in a classroom – where your lesson is about the application you are implementing within your organisation.  Delivery costs should be approximately the same as attending public courses but there will be development costs involved; how much will depend on the degree of customisation required

Phase three/Maintenance

Once your website is live and all the users and developers are trained, we move to phase three or maintenance.  Additional training maybe required if you upgrade the version of the application or introduce new features (depending on the enormity of the changes). 

Phase three training is primarily needed for staff churn.  Developers should start by attending the public courses and then learn peer to peer, consider pair programming here.  For business users it is beneficial to attend public classroom training to get the solid foundation to build on.  Just peer to peer onboarding, while tempting, can perpetuate bad habits and often leaves knowledge gaps in the real understanding of the application.  At the very least you need a set of learning objectives that must be ticked off preferably by your in-house super user.

Aceik is a Sitecore training provider.  We teach public courses around the country.  You can view the public schedule here: Upcoming Courses New courses are being worked on constantly so if you do not see what you want please enquire here or email David Newman at the link below.  We also provide custom or private training email David Newman in the first instance or if you are an Aceik customer already contact your account manager.

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